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September 21, 2014

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Green Lake Branch : About the Branch

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Green Lake Branch
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Closed Wednesday, Sept. 24

All four locations of The Seattle Public Library in the northwest region (Broadview, Green Lake, Greenwood, Wallingford branches) will be closed Wednesday, Sept. 24 for a regional in-service staff day. More ...

About the Green Lake Branch

The Green Lake Branch of The Seattle Public Library has:

 

Architecture

The renovated Green Lake Branch opened March 6, 2004. It was the sixth project completed under the "Libraries for All" building program. (See the Green Lake Branch Building Facts for more information.)

 

The historic branch is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has been named a landmark building by Seattle's Landmarks Preservation Board.

 

The renovation was designed by Snyder Hartung Kane Strauss Architects and built by W.G. Clark Construction Co.

 

Seattle artist Dennis Evans created two painted mixed-media works for the branch that are part of a series for five of the Library's Carnegie branches. All the pieces reflect classical liberal arts themes. Each branch will have a permanent reference painting and each will have a painting designed to circulate among the branches. The Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs manages the Library's public art program.

 

A stained glass window created by artist Richard Spaulding that was installed over the entry door in September 1978 remains at the branch.

 

History

Library service in Green Lake dates back to 1905, when The Seattle Public Library opened a small, one-room structure on the east side of the lake, several blocks south of the present building.

 

The structure was built on a wooden platform. A board sidewalk led from the street and the streetcar tracks to the library. In rainy weather, the tiny building was surrounded by mud and water and young boys begged the librarian for twine so they could fish over the railing.

 

In 1908, wealthy philanthropist Andrew Carnegie agreed to donate $35,000 to build a replacement branch. Local residents rallied to the cause and raised $3,000 to buy the current branch site; the city contributed another $1,000.

 

The branch, which was designed by W. Marbury Somervell and Joseph S. Coté, opened in July 1910 at a cost of $37,749.90.

 

The T-shaped building followed one of Carnegie's preferred designs for libraries - main-floor reading areas and a lower- level auditorium. Wings on either side of the front of the building feature two sets of huge operable vertical windows that allow natural light and fresh air to pour into the building.

 

Tall ceilings contribute to a sense of spaciousness and rich detailing and use of wood throughout the interior adds to the warm, historic feel of the branch.

 

Over the years, the branch was remodeled several times, including one project in 1969 that for several years turned the lower-level auditorium into the headquarters for the Mobile Branch.

 

Libraries for All capital projects and the Green Lake Branch

In 1998, voters approved the $196.4 million "Libraries for All" bond measure and The Seattle Public Library Foundation pledged to contribute privately raised money to improve the entire Library system. The plan included renovating the Green Lake Branch.

 

Construction began in May 2003, with the grand reopening on March 6, 2004.

Libraries for All: Investing in Experiences

Green Lake Branch
7364 E. Green Lake Dr. N.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-684-7547

Hours:

Mon:

1 pm - 8 pm

Tue:

1 pm - 8 pm

Wed:

11 am - 6 pm

Thu:

11 am - 6 pm

Fri:

Closed

Sat:

11 am - 6 pm

Sun:

1 pm - 5 pm


Regional Manager:
Karen Spiel
 

Nearest branches open every day: