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August 1, 2014

Teens - Books the Library Loves

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Bless Me, Ultima Bless Me, Ultima

by Rudolfo A. Anaya

The battle for good and evil rages in this classic Mexican-American story set in 1940s New Mexico. Ultima is a curandera, or healer. She is confronted by an evil family who wishes to do harm in their rural community. I love this book’s symbolism, characters, conflicts, and descriptions of the llano and rural New Mexico.

-Ken, High Point

The DivinersThe Diviners

by Libba Bray

The supernatural and the roaring ‘20s intertwine in this story. Evie is sent away to live in New York City with her Uncle Will—a curator of the struggling Museum of American Folklore, Superstition and the Occult. His specialty comes in handy when detectives need help finding a paranormal killer. Evie herself actually has secret powers that can break the case, but she's scared to use them and time is ticking.

-Renee, Ballard

Anya's GhostAnya's Ghost

by Patrick Ness

Anya's life couldn't get any worse. She's embarrassed by her Russian mother, she only has one friend, and the guy she's crushing on doesn't know she exists. Then she becomes friends with a ghost and her luck changes for the better…at first. It turns out that the ghost isn't telling the whole truth, and soon Anya is in a situation scarier than she could have imagined. This graphic novel will send chills down your spine.

-Kate, Madrona-Sally Goldmark

The Golden Day The Golden Day

by Ursula Dubosarsky

One day, 11 Australian schoolgirls take a field trip with their teacher, who inexplicably goes missing. She never returns. Or does she? This lovely, chilling short novel draws upon the author’s own childhood in Sydney, and is influenced by the paintings of Charles Blackman. The story reminded me of something you’d read in The New Yorker, beautifully written and memorable long after you’ve finished.

—Christiane, Queen Anne

RootlessRootless

by Chris Howard

Banyan is alone and barely surviving in a bleak and extremely dangerous world void of any plant life. Scraping together the occasional meal as a tree builder and creating landscapes out of scrap metal, he clings to the crazy hope that his kidnapped father may still be alive. A high-adrenaline adventure complete with government plots, murderous gangs of starving people, slave runners and man-eating grasshoppers, this dystopian novel reads like The Road for teens.

-Jennifer, Greenwood

Throne of GlassThrone of Glass

by Sarah J. Maas

Throne of Glass is the first full-length book in a fantasy series prefaced by four novellas (read them first!) that build the world of Celaena, pet student of the Assassin's Guild in a land where magic has disappeared concurrently with the rise of a tyrant. Recommended for fans of Garth Nix's Sabriel.

-Deb, Central

SunshineSunshine

by Robin McKinley

Sunshine takes a drive to the country, and wakes up chained to a ballroom wall with no idea how she got there. And she's not alone—her captors and fellow captive are vampires, and no one kidnapped by vampires has lived to tell the tale. This is the vampire book for people who hate vampire books—McKinley's skill with language creates a rich, densely layered story of horror, identity and love.

-Kate, Madrona-Sally Goldmark

CinderCinder

by Marissa Meyer

In this futuristic dystopian take on the Cinderella story, Cinder is a cyborg mechanic who saves herself...along with the rest of the planet. Meyer, a Tacoma author, uses her Lunar Chronicle series to recast other "hapless female" fairy tales in a more progressive light.

-Deb, Central

Sabriel Sabriel

by Garth Nix

Sabriel must save her father after he is trapped in Death while doing the work of the Abhorsen, keeper of the dead. Armed with tools to keep the dead in death, and having dangerous allies who aren't all they seem, Sabriel must learn to be the Abhorsen. Sabriel has everything—kisses passionate enough to keep your soul from being sucked out of your body, terrifying action and people you can never trust but love anyway.

-Kate, Madrona-Sally Goldmark

Mexican WhiteboyMexican Whiteboy

by Matt de la Peña

This book takes you right into the barrio with Danny, who speaks no Spanish, yet doesn't fit into his prep school either. His uncles’ Latino families have him visit for the summer and warmly try to tease him out of his shell. Enjoy meeting these relatives as they, and baseball, open Danny to a fuller life. The baseball in Mexican Whiteboy is passionately, painfully authentic. The story is intense and ultimately uplifting.

-Guy, Substitute Librarian

When I Was the GreatestWhen I Was the Greatest

by Jason Reynolds

Ali lives with his mother and sister in a part of Brooklyn that feels a million miles away from both hipsters and the Huxtables. He hangs out with his best friend, Noodles, and Noodles' brother Needles, who has Tourette's syndrome. When the three of them are invited to an exclusive adults-only party, things get out of control, and Ali has to decide where his loyalties lie.

-Hayden, Central

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the UniverseAristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

This is a beautifully written coming-of-age story about two very different Mexican-American boys coming to terms with their heritage and identities. The unexpected friendship between Ari and Dante is powerful, raw and ultimately transforming. I loved spending time with them and didn't want to say goodbye when I got to the end of the book!

-Eric, Northgate

ForecastForecast

by Elise Stephens

Imagine you knew of a door that could give you a power. Maybe the ability to see the future. Would you take it? Calvin does in an attempt to save his family from his father. However, this decision opens up more problems for him. Some people would kill to use someone with this power to further their own ends. This is an exciting book from a Seattle author.

-Meranda, Central

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